Going-green

Green is the new black.  And when you landscape your yard there are a number of ways to go green.

One of the easiest ways to go green when you landscape is to plant trees.  By planting trees you can help reduce greenhouse gases and help cool the environment.  For example, 100 trees removes 235 lbs of pollutants each year and 1 acre of trees produce 260 lbs of oxygen each year.  The best part is that by strategically planting shade trees by your home, you will decrease your utility bills by as much as 35% in the summer and 25% in the winter.

So, when landscaping your yard, ask for a sustainable yard.  It’s good for your wallet and good for the environment!

Check out the previous post, water by numbers, to see easy ways to conserve water.


WaterQuest Landscaping
Proudly serving New Mexico since 1981!  Visit our Website: www.WaterQuest.com.

Posted in Plants & Trees | Leave a comment

water by numbers

  • Water once a week in March.
  • Water twice a week in April and May.
  • Water three times a week in June, July and August.
  • Water twice a week in September and October.
  • Water once a week in November.

Here are some other easy ways to save water:

  • Use an automatic irrigation system.
  • Keep lawn free of weeds.
  • Mow less often or mow higher than usual.
  • Check for leaks in pipes, hoses, faucets.


WaterQuest Landscaping
Proudly serving New Mexico since 1981!  Visit our Website: www.WaterQuest.com.

Posted in Lawns | Leave a comment

Did your plants survive the winter?

If you’re plant lost all its leaves or all the leaves turned brown, don’t immediately go replace it.  You’re plant may still be alive.  With a bit of patience and care, your plant may recover.  If you would prefer immediate results, then just replace the plant.

The easiest way to tell if your plant is still alive is to check the stem.  The stem should be pliable, green, and be green on the inside if you scratch away a bit of the outer layer.  If your plant’s stem is mushy or brittle, then your plant has died and you need to replace it.

To help your plant recover, you should first trim away the dead parts of the plant and stem.  Then, place the plant in a spot where it receives half as much sunlight as usual, or where it receives indirect light.  Water only when the soil is dry, but do not let the soil dry out completely, i.e. it is important not to overwater. 

In 3-4 weeks you should see new stems and leaves being produced!


WaterQuest Landscaping
Proudly serving New Mexico since 1981!  Visit our Website: www.WaterQuest.com.

Posted in Plants & Trees | 1 Comment

Lush Xeriscaping

Most people’s perceive xeriscaping as boring, stark, sparse, just a sea of gravel.  That’s a bad stereotype.

You can actually xeriscape your yard and make it feel lush, colorful and beautiful.

In New Mexico, your xeric plant choices are beautiful and plentiful.  Here are a few ideas to get you started:


Spanish Broom                                               Butterfly Bush

Desert Willow                                        Chinese Pistache


WaterQuest Landscaping
Proudly serving New Mexico since 1981!  Visit our Website: www.WaterQuest.com.

Posted in Xeriscaping | Leave a comment

Memorial Day is right around the corner…

That means it’s time to fertilize!

Well-established and healthy trees may not need much supplemental feeding, but fertilizing smaller trees and shrubs is very important. Your payback will include better resistance to disease and insects, improved flowering, and much quicker establishment than similar plants denied regular fertilization.

How And When Tree Fertilization Should Happen

Fertilizing trees should put the nutrients within reach of the feeder roots. This means feeding an area that reaches from about 1/3 of the distance from the tree trunk to the drip line (on the inside) to a spot about the same distance outside the drip line. Fertilizer needs to be placed into holes that are about 6 to 12” deep throughout this area. For good distribution, you may need up to 10 feeding holes per inch of trunk diameter up 6 to 12” deep throughout the target area (a tree 5” across may need 50 or so holes in the feeding zone). That’s a lot of holes, but it assures that the fertilizer will be evenly available to the tree.

Trees can be fertilized anytime between when the sap goes down in fall or winter until about mid-July (at the latest). Fertilizing trees between July and fall stimulates late growth that gets no chance to harden off and is more susceptible to damage from winter cold and winds. Early spring is probably the ideal feeding time, but with slow release materials, any time during the window will give excellent results.

Newly planted trees and shrubs benefit the most from regular fertilizing during their first 5 years in the landscape. In establishment, growth, and flowering, there is just no comparison between plants that are fed and those left to go it alone.

Remember:

  • Feeding of recent transplants during the first 5 years helps plants mature quickly.
  • Balanced fertility is important. Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium each perform distinct functions in your landscape plants.
  • Don’t fertilize trees between July 15th and Fall after trees start dormancy or resting periods.


WaterQuest Landscaping
Proudly serving New Mexico since 1981!  Visit our Website: www.WaterQuest.com.

Posted in Fertilization, Plants & Trees | Leave a comment